Indigenous Peoples vs. Gibe III Dam

The Mursi and Nyangatom are two of many pastoralist groups in the SNNPR region of Ethiopia, and surrounding area, who risk losing access to their resources, especially water, because of a series of dams being built along the Omo River. Photo credit: Salini Impregilo

Karayu vs. Land Grabbing in Oromia

Karayu traditionally live in the Fantalle district but many were evicted in 2006 for the creation of the Awash National Park and development projects such as the Metahara Sugar Factory and Upper Awash Agro-industry Enterprise. Karayu are also forbidden access to their only water source, the Awash River. Photo Credit: Flickr

Hamar: Shift to Agro-Pastoralism

Many Hamar living in the SNNPR region are unable to herd cattle due to climate change, drought, and increased sugar operations. As a result, some Hamar are retraining as farmers to survive. Despite farming crops, many Hamar retain traditional ways of life. Whether pastoralism is sustainable may depend on government development. Photo credit: Africa Geographic

The Borana

The Borana live in the Oromia region of southern Ethiopia. Despite holding off major industrial change, they are in land disputes with the government and other pastoralist groups in Kenya. Photo credit: CGIAR, ILRI/S.Mann

Anywaa (Anuak) vs. Nuer vs. Gambella

The Anywaa are an agro-pastoralist group living in Gambella. The Nuer are pastoralists who primarily live in South Sudan, but have found much of their population fleeing to Gambella as refugees, resulting in conflict with the Anywaa. Today, the country is reportedly home to the world’s most internally displaced peoples. Photo credit: Francois Servranckx/MSF

The Afar

The Afar pastoralist group’s way of life is at risk from the Ethiopian Government, who allocated their land to large-scale agriculture and sugar industries. As a result, the Afar have resistance organizations seeking a multi-dimensional resolution defending their land rights. Photo credit: ADH/Stefan Trappe